Archive for the 'the faith of graffiti' Category

Summer 2015 Sticker Quadrathlon!

It’s been an incredibly busy summer creating traveling exhibitions and building a new digital archive, a new Web site, and a new Street Art course. Here is the syllabus for the course.

St. Lawrence University Street Art Graphics!

AAH 3014 SYLLABUS – Fall 2015

Course Overview

In this 200-level studio course, students will work individually and in groups to create street art in the form of wheatpastes, stickers, stencils, silkscreens, and a final project that will be placed in a public venue in Potsdam or Canton. A social media component is also included to meet other street artists, see their work online, and become part of the global street art community. The course will examine concepts of character design, appropriation, memes, tropes, and culture jamming, as well as the “do-it-yourself” DIY punk ethic that is the basis of much street art. In addition, the course offers students the opportunity to conduct research and write about street art ephemera for an online digital archive available on three platforms:

The Street Art Graphics digital archive is based primarily on contemporary street art stickers and ephemera related to street culture from countries around the world, including Canada, Egypt, England, France, Germany, Indonesia, Russia, Spain, Ukraine, and the United States. Topics addressed include animal rights, consumer capitalism, the environment, football, gender and sexuality, labor, police brutality, political protests, racism, social justice, and surveillance, among others. The course will enable students to use real world examples of street art culture to understand current global issues. Incorporating critical thinking and visual/media literacies, students will learn how to annotate images, hone their writing skills, and contribute their work to a vibrant and unique digital image archive. A digital geo-mapping project at the end of the semester will further contextualize items in the archive. A new Web site for this purpose, entitled People’s History Archive, will allow students to publish mini-exhibitions about street art ephemera with timelines and maps.


  • To learn how to create, analyze, and interpret images and situate them in global socio-historical contexts
  • To learn about different rhetorical strategies artists employ in order to communicate their various messages
  • To improve writing skills
  • To gain a better understanding of digital technologies and their real world applications
  • To contribute materials to an international digital image library of arts and sciences and scholarly Web sites

Ultimately, this course is about creativity, finding your own voice, and figuring out what you want to communicate as an artist. Craftsmanship and careful attention to detail in your work are also very important.

RodchenkoAleksandr Rodchenko, Lengiz. Books on all the branches of knowledge,

advertising poster for the Leningrad Department of Gosizdat

(State Publishing House), 1924


Although this is a studio course, there will be a fair amount of reading and writing, which are important skills in your career as an artist. Therefore, even though we will be meeting three hours a week in person, be expected to work outside of class. You are welcome to use the gallery workspace during regular open hours (M-TH from noon to 8:00 p.m. and F/Sat from noon to 5:00 p.m.).

Attendance & Participation

Attendance is mandatory. You are allowed no more than three absences during the semester, but after that, each absence will lower your grade by .50 of your final grade. Late arrivals or early departures will be pro-rated and counted as absences. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact a classmate to make up any assignments. Demonstrations and presentations will not be repeated. Cell phones are not allowed in class. Please bring your journal to every class. With advance notice, some classes will meet in the Newell Center for Arts Technology.

Quality of Work

Projects should demonstrate your creativity, idea/source material/research, craftsmanship, attention to details, technical elements and mastery, experimentation, progress, effort, and evidence of time spent on the assignment. Did you go beyond approaching your project as an exercise, and thoroughly investigate your ideas? In what ways?

Evaluative factors of projects will include:

  • Development and Preparation
    • Prepared for class & ready to work
    • Sketchbook, models, or other prep work
    • Other research and development
  • Overall Craft
    • Craftsmanship, care in execution, and attention to details
    • Technique/technical skills
    • Material and process sensitivity
  • Concept and Creativity
    • Full development of initial ideas
    • Creative approach to concept, original design and content
    • Consideration and application of formal knowledge
  • Effort and Final Presentation
    • Final touches/clean-up as necessary
    • Articulation of idea/intent in critique
    • Critique skills and comments for others
    • Ready for critique on time


The final grade will be evaluated primarily from the quality of your work based on the objectives of the assignments and how successfully these objectives were accomplished. Completion of all work is essential, and attendance and participation are mandatory. While effort will be considered (attitude, progress, improvement), your final grade is based mostly on the overall quality of your work demonstrated in the final portfolio. We will discuss criteria for evaluation as a group, so that everyone is clear about grading.

Work will be discussed in critiques and individual conferences. You will be given grades for assignments in individual meetings at midterm. If you have specific concerns about your grade or would like grade feedback before this time, please schedule a meeting with me. There will also be a final critique and final meeting for feedback at or near the end of the semester.

Point System

4.0 – Phenomenal

3.5 – Excellent

3.0 – Very Good

2.5 – Significantly above average

2.0 – Adequate fulfillment of ALL requirements of class

1.5 – Less than adequate fulfillment of MOST requirements of class

1.0 – Passing but not meeting the requirements of the course

0.0 – Failure to meet the minimum requirements of the course

Note: Completely fulfilling the requirements of the course in a solid way is considered a 2.0 grade. To excel, you must demonstrate additional commitment and effort that will be evident in your work. In order to receive your final grade, you must attend an individual checkout meeting in which your work space area is proven to be cleaned and returned to its original gallery condition.

Required Publications @ SLU Bookstore or Amazon

  • Stickers: From Punk Rock to Contemporary Art by D.B. Burkeman with Monica LoCascio (Cathy will hand out in class)
  • Street Art: The Graffiti Revolution by Cedar Lewisohn
  • Street Art Cookbook: A Guide to Techniques and Materials by Benke Carlsson and Hop Louie

Other readings will be handed out in class and/or posted in the course’s Sakai site. Please print them out and bring to class when I assign them. Assigned readings are mandatory. Each reading is designed to enhance your learning outside of class and give you the intellectual tools to make, critique, and discuss art. Critiques and artist statements and evaluations must reference the assigned reading. You may be required to write responses or summaries and/or be quizzed on any readings or lecture materials.

Optional Publication @ SLU Bookstore or Amazon

  • Street Art Book: 60 Artists in their own Words by Ric Blackshaw and Liz Farrelly

Additional Resources

The Owen D. Young Library is starting to build a small collection of resources related to street art. In the meantime, I have brought in several books and journals from my personal library for you to refer to. Please don’t take them from the gallery or lend them to anyone. Some of these resources would be difficult to replace.


The gallery will provide most of the tools and equipment you will need for this course (journal binding materials, X-acto knives, cutting mats, silkscreens, ink, etc., but you should plan on buying a large sketchpad (18×24 inches) from the bookstore, as well as drawing pencils of your choice.

Getting started

The first class project involves having you create a text-based street name and a visual “brand” or avatar. The avatar can be image-based or text-based, and it is one that you will use, re-use, and refine throughout the course of the semester in your artworks and on various social media sites. You can draw or paint your avatar or use Photoshop, a Xerox machine, etc. It’s “do-it-yourself” (DIY) and totally up to you. Using these street names, you will create primary (or secondary accounts) in Facebook, Flickr, Pinterest, Instagram, and/or Twitter. On Flickr and Facebook, sign up for at least five current, active groups related to street art (keywords = street art, stickers, wheatpaste, stencils, etc.). You are encouraged to join many more than five groups in order to give you a better sense of the global street art community. Go to my Facebook page to find suggestions for street artists and collectives.

Sign up for regular mailings from:

Bookmark these Web sites and spend some time with them:

Later in the semester, I will add you as student cataloguers to the Artstor Digital Library, but be sure to go in and change your password as soon as you get an email prompt from me.

Street Art Studio Projects!

During the course of the semester, we will explore and work in a variety of media related to street art and street culture, including wheatpastes, stickers, stencils, silk-screens, and zines. I am also hoping that we will collaborate as a group to create a piece of public street art in downtown Potsdam or Canton. Projects during the semester may be altered, added, or removed according to the progress of the class and as time, facilities, and supplies allow.

Do the right thing!

There will be designated areas in the Griffiths Arts Center and the Noble Center to display your work. We will also try to arrange other public display areas elsewhere on campus. It is very important that you not vandalize personal, public, or private property in relation to anything you create this semester. Doing so would jeopardize the future of the course and get us all in trouble. If you are caught vandalizing property, you will receive a 0 for the course. Chances are that if you ask, you might be able to post things in certain areas with permission. We’ll talk more about this in class.

esm-artificial stickers


A large envelope arrived recently at work filled with bright, multi-colored stickers by the Vancouver-based street artist and graphic designer Kenn Sakurai, also known as esm-artificial. His are hand-silkscreened, hand-separated, machine- and hand-cut stickers of words and phrases, such as “I love that you love,” “new wave,” “I LOVE YOU MORE ESM,” “CARE BULLY,” “LITTLE HATERS,” “SALAD BAR,” “FREE EGGS,” “FLIRT MONSTER,” and “NEW ROMANTIC.” Sizes of the ones he sent to me range from about an inch to seven inches. Some stickers reference music, pop culture, films, and film stars like Planet of the Apes, Hello Kitty, and Audrey Hepburn.



Kenn told me via email that for the words and phrases stickers, he draws the text by hand, scans it, and die cuts it using a plotter. At the end, everything is pieced together letter by letter, which he said is the most time-consuming, but on a full day, he and a studio assistant can make anywhere from 30 to 50 stickers at a time. The craftsmanship is really exquisite!


Artist’s statement

“I have been involved in making prints and stickers using serigraphy, aerosol and other paint, vinyl & wood for many many years. I am fascinated by the sticker format including post office labels, pharmacy prescription labels, “hello, my name is” stickers, adhesive price tags and stickers on fruit.

Curated gallery showings are fantastic but doing work outdoors has a different kind of buzz and immediacy that motivates me to create more user-friendly, spontaneous humorous work for all ages. My dialogue is intended to be colourful, quirky, thought-provoking, flippant and reactionary that in a quick glance can resonate on a deeper level with the viewer. I hope the public placement of my stickers invites the viewer to react to it by laughing, taking a photo/sharing or stealing it for their own personal collection.

It’s hard to put into words, the odd feeling of exhilaration I get when putting up something as seemingly simple as a sticker into a public space and with the hope that it engages the viewer.

There is a kind of intrigue and new life to a sticker that develops on the street when several other collections from different artists build up in a small space over time. It is like the work morphs into a new being that is controlled only by a synthesis of many different individuals adding to the ‘sticker bombed’ sites.

It has been fascinating to see from my sticker beginnings at home as a kid to more serious sticker development in art school (1994) until now. I can stand back and not only be able to see my work from an early perspective within the movement but also be a regular public viewer in watching how much the phenomenon of stickering has grown throughout cities of the world today.


I feel as though I can put out a sort of spontaneous ‘word of the day’ or ‘phrase of the day’ sticker without any forced preconceived notion. It keeps things moving in the moment for me. I have always loved stickers such as ‘I’m with stupid’, ‘Have a Nice day’, ‘Keep on Truckin,’ etc. and noted that I have never known the originators of these types of stickers and found it refreshing that the ego, names, or tags were not attached to these works. I do have some stickers that include my name but the bulk of my work is simply about the wordplay and text that I try to create and build by hand. Artists such as On Kawara, John Baldessari, Espo, Ed Ruscha, Lawrence Weiner & Ron Terada’s work resonate with me as well as the likes of Pee-wee Herman, MAD Magazine, SCTV and Bob Ross.

The creative element to my stickering is not random and I try to specifically design a text or type that suits the word or phrase that I tend to illustrate. The colour choice is integral to giving these works a voice in the public space.

The culmination of my hundreds & thousands of individual stickers and prints is what creates a final large colourful tree-like structure for me in my mind. But it is the ‘leaves’ which are the individual stickers that carry the messages of the day to the people.”

–Kenn Sakurai, a.k.a. esm-artificial



More from Easy Tiger, #1 Asia Stickers Museum

Meiffi Oscar from Easy Tiger, #1 Asia Stickers Museum in Indonesia sent me a little more information about his background and interest in stickers and sticker culture (see also previous post on Indonesian political stickers from Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum). He writes:

“I [went on] a motorcycle tour from Java to Sumatra from December 2010 to February 2011. It was remarkable achievement for me cause I used my classic Japanese bike (Honda CB 100cc, 1976). Along the way I saw nature, culture, and got a lot of stickers. Instead of sticking them on my helmet, I just kept them for no reason. It was because I had no copy of them, and limited edition (in terms that I don’t wanna lose it cause it’s an artifact from my journey). Then I got a chance to visit Electric Ladyland Museum in Amsterdam and it made me kept thinking of what kind of museum that I should build.

Then voila, I remembered my motorcycle clubs stickers I had before my trip. I decided to turn the idea into a museum in August 2012 (collecting, hunting, online buying, exchange, asking for donations, etc.).

What I meant before with ignorable stuff (in my other note) is sticker is great art in a small size. People never notice it. If they have it, they stick it. They never think of the story behind it or if they won’t see it again in the future. In terms of preserving this culture, I start to built this art movement.

In Indonesia, lots of people just laugh at classic or vintage stickers from 80’s now. Those stickers are so rare. So it’s my duty to track them, give back the good old memories. In fact, it’s still relevant with nowadays issues such ‘quote’ stickers like ‘silence is gold,’ ‘time is money,’ etc. To prevent this stuff from being abandoned in the future, I also preserve the stickers from present day. I’m thinking about the legacy for the next generation.

Whether it’s for art or research or exhibition or… just for laughs. I bet 100%, once we see stickers from our youth era, we will at least smile. That’s the point. To keep the spirit alive. Even it’s small, cheap, full of tacky or cheesy words, or vulgar, or whatever, I’ll collect all of them. They are the treasure, the legend itself.”

Thanks, Meiffi!  Here is another sticker from the batch I received from him yesterday.  I’m going to need a little help making sense of it.


Indonesian political stickers from Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum

Oli at Hatch Kingdom told me that someone named Meiffi Oscar has opened a new sticker museum in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, called Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum.


I got in touch with Meiffi through Facebook, and we have traded some stickers and zines. When asked about Easy Tiger, Meiffi wrote:

“Well, actually the place is my dorm so it’s pretty small for a ‘museum.’ But I dare to claim it though. I got involved in this project when I had inspiration from visiting a unique museum in Amsterdam called Electric Ladyland Museum. After that I’m so eager to play a role as a museum director. And voila, I started the museum about a month later. In fact, the stickers passion is genetic in my blood since I was 15. I’m an old bike rider so we collect lots of motorcycle clubs stickers. And that push me to start to think about how to preserve this art so I can share it with others (like vintage stickers, limited stickers, etc.). I love museums and like being a museum guide, but I never thought about being the director. The way I saw the director of the museum in Amsterdam influenced me to build a small project but something fun and worthy to inspire people. I combine it with vintage stuff, music, and books, so it’ll entertain my friends who just want to chill out. We have a radio though. Haha. So yes, it’s worth having this project.”

For more information about Easy Tiger, go to Meiffi’s blog Stickers Culture, some of which is in Indonesian and some in English.

Yesterday, I received four new political stickers that Meiffi sent from Indonesia. I am going to share what he wrote in his letter to me to help explain the stickers.

“Here is my small package. It’s about the new President, Joko Widodo (Jokowi), who won the election on July 20th [2014] and will lead us now till 2019.

There is a lot of unique facts about this person. He was an ex-governor of Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta. And the way he leads is unusual and eccentric. He loves to be in the front line when he visits his people. No wonder during the flood in Jakarta, he even took a boat and met refugees directly and straight. No such formal protocol. Once, he checked a sewer by himself. Yes, by himself. It’s not propaganda. But this is his habit for many, many years. Before, he was mayor of Solo (Surakarta). I’ve got a unique story about this. In Surakarta, there’s a public space [that] was occupied by the street sellers for many years. It was a problem for city planners. So this guy used a different approach. He used a smooth approach. By inviting them to have a dinner at his house and they discussed the problem together. But it’s not the end. He did this many times to persuade them to follow the government program about relocation. And guess what, those street sellers want to be relocated after all. And how many times did Jokowi invite them to his house? More than 40 times! I’m not joking, more than 40!

So what I’m trying to say is there’s a new hope in this guy. He tries to make a revolution about Indonesian mentality. About corruption, discipline, hard working, unique, and eccentric (he loves metal music). Perhaps you’re not surprised cause maybe you know lots of leaders like that, but for Indonesians, this is new! And this is a breakthrough.

These stickers [present] a unique concept about how Jokowi and his vice president are doing a blusukan (Javanese term for exploring deeply looking for something).


So no wonder the volunteer for the election made these stickers. Jokowi in here, Jokowi in there. With his white long sleeves and informal appearance.


And the design is so unique, using the style of the Hergé [cartoonist], Tintin! A [Belgian] journalist who traveled all around the world with lots of adventures. That’s Jokowi! A nation hero!


I think that’s enough for this letter. My apologies if my English isn’t so good or you may find incorrect grammar in it. I try my best. Once again, thank you for considering Indonesian political stickers. I’m glad to share it with you. Keep roaring! Roarrrrrr!”

Thank you, Meiffi, for these great stickers from Asia.  I’ll add them to the Street Art Graphics digital archive!

Paper leaflets today

In an article North Korea Warns South Over Leaflets, the NY Times reported last week, “North Korea opened fire on Friday after anti-Pyongyang activists in the South sent large balloons sailing across the border with leaflets criticizing the North’s government…. In a commentary published on Saturday [October 11, 2014], the North’s official Korean Central News Agency said that the leaflets were ‘an intolerable political provocation’ and ‘psychological warfare,’ and that Seoul and Washington were behind them, according to the South Korean news agency Yonhap.”


Check out earlier posts about my Paper Bullets sticker exhibition in Berlin and to see an example of a paper bullet from the Gulf War.

For more info and pictures about recent paper leaflets dropped in North Korea, see also South Korean Activists Drop Anti-Pyongyang Leaflets and USBs into North Korea (International Business Times) and Rival Koreas trade fire over propaganda balloons (UK Mail Online).

NKOREA-paper leaflets-sm

Photo by Ahn Young-Joon from the Associated Press (I will remove photo from post if the AP makes a stink.)

“Paper Bullets: 100 Years of Political Stickers from Around the World” exhibition opens 13 Sept 2014


Paper Bullets: 100 Years of Political Stickers from around the World

13 September – 24 October 2014

Opening 13 September 2014 at 7:00 p.m.

Paper Bullets front to Nadine

Publicly placed stickers with printed images and/or text have been used for decades as a form of political protest or to advocate political agendas. In the United States as early as the mid-1910s, for example, labor unions created the first “stickerettes,” or “silent agitators,” to oppose poor working conditions, intimidate bosses, and condemn capitalism. Later, during World War II, Allied and Axis countries dropped gummed “paper bullets” or “confetti soldiers” from the sky as a form of psychological warfare to demoralize both troops and civilians. And during the 1960s and ’70s American civil rights era, “night raiders” protested the war in Vietnam and U.S. imperialism, and called for racial and gender equity among blacks, whites, men, and women.

Drawing from the private collection of Catherine Tedford, the exhibition highlights political stickers from Canada, Egypt, England, Germany, Spain, Russia, Ukraine, and the United States dating from the early 20th century to present day. Topics include labor, animal rights, the environment, gender and sexuality, football, consumer capitalism, surveillance, and police brutality.

Political stickers in the exhibition support Catalan independence, for example, while others document the Arab Spring uprisings, Maidan protests in Ukraine, and the global Occupy revolution. Political stickers also comment upon the U.S. war in Vietnam, recent Russian elections, the current economic crisis in Spain, and the effects of urban development in Berlin, Germany. The exhibition also features stickers that focus on U.S. Presidents Richard Nixon, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama.

Catherine Tedford is gallery director at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York. She first discovered street art stickers while visiting Berlin in 2003 and has since collected over 10,000 examples from countries around the world. She writes about political stickers on her research blog Stickerkitty and has presented papers at academic conferences in England, Germany, Scotland and the United States. She has collaborated with Hatch Kingdom on two previous exhibitions of street art stickers in Canada and the United States. This is her first sticker exhibition in Europe.

The exhibition is supported by a faculty research grant from St. Lawrence University.

For more information, contact Catherine Tedford at or Oliver Baudach, the Director of Hatch Kingdom, at

Paper Bullets back

EPD exhibition review Politische Geschosse aus Papier by Nadine Emmerich

Deutschlandfunk radio interview Sticker-Ausstellung – Die Macht der Aufkleber with Oliver Kranz

Art School Vets “Paper Bullets – 100 Jahre politische Sticker aus der ganzen Welt” im Hatch Sticker Museum

Bright Trade Show Paper Bullets at Hatch Sticker Museum

JUST Urban Art Blog Paper Bullets – 100 Years of Political Stickers from around the World

Lodown Magazine PAPER BULLETS @ hatch sticker museum

RBB Online “100 Jahre politische Sticker” im Hatch Sticker Museum – Politischer Protest auf bunten Blättchen

Installation shots on Flickr

New stickers from Spain for digital archive and writing assignment

I haven’t had much time to post on Stickerkitty lately, but it doesn’t mean I haven’t been keeping busy with other things. I heard recently from SLU professor of modern languages, Marina Llorenta, that she’d like to repeat the assignment we created in 2012 to have her students conduct research on political stickers from Spain for her course on “Literature, Film, and Popular Culture in Contemporary Spain,” a project that later turned into an SLU art gallery exhibition called Pegatinas Políticas, which you can read about here. To prepare for the upcoming assignment this fall 2014 semester, I have been keeping an eye out for any sources from which I could acquire new Spanish stickers for her students to analyze. Last November, I contacted close to 30 Spanish political and grassroots organizations via their Facebook Web sites without much response. One group, the Popular Unity Movement Against Crisis, sent me 19 fantastic digital image files but didn’t send any physical items. Marina and I agreed we wanted the students to study the actual paper or vinyl stickers in real life, however, so my searching continued.

I’ve had much better luck finding Spanish stickers this spring. I contacted another SLU professor of modern languages, Steven White, who is currently in Madrid directing the SLU off-campus study program. He made contact with someone via to help acquire a set of Spanish stickers dating from the late 1970s to present day (click here to view 31 stickers). A few of the 1970s stickers depict Adolfo Suárez, the first democratically elected prime minister of Spain after General Francisco Franco’s 41-year dictatorship. Suárez just passed away in March of 2014, and Steven thought perhaps that’s why these stickers appeared so recently on the market.


There are several Catalan independence movement stickers in the group, and from the same dealer we also acquired a set of eight historical stickers by the Direccion General de Juventud y Promocion Sociocultural that promoted the new Spanish Constitution of 1978. The sticker, Viva La Constitucion, La Soberania De España Reside En El Pueblo, means “Long Live The Constitution, The Sovereignty Of The People Living In Spain.”


Steven, a poet himself, is friends with the Spanish poet and sociologist Jorge Riechmann who helped contribute several stickers relating to current environmental issues. The sticker from Ecologistas En Acción (“Ecologists in Action”) states, Si No Reducen Las Emisiones, No Nos Representan,or “If You Do Not Reduce Emissions, Do Not Represent Us.” A total of 47 new stickers from Steven White and Jorge Riechmann can be viewed here.


Other stickers that have come in during the past couple of weeks represent various political parties and organizations, such as the Confederación Nacional del Trabajo (National Confederation of Labor), the Izquierda Anticapitalista (Anti-Capitalist Left), the Liga Estudantil Galega (Galician Students’ League), the Galiza Nova (the New Galicia), the Partido Comunista del Pueblo Castellano (Communist Party of the Castillian People? or Peoples of Spain?), and the Esquerda Unida (United Left). One can get a pretty good lesson in the range of Spanish political parties and Spanish autonomous communities by studying these stickers. Os Nosos Dereitos Non Se Recortan from the Esquerda Unida sticker below is Galician for “Our Rights Are Not Cut.”


And my sticker pal, Oli Baudach at Hatch Kingdom, is originally from Barcelona. He was there recently and sent me a bunch of new Catalan stickers. The one below depicts the Catalan donkey, a symbol often used in reaction to the Spanish symbol of the Osborne bull, superimposed on top of the red and yellow striped Senyera flag with a blue star, or Estelada blava of the Catalan independence movement.


All told and with the help of friends and others, there are now 139 new stickers from all over Spain dating from the 1970s to present day for Marina’s students to analyze and write about. I will fine-tune the assignment for the fall of 2014. Last time, we had the students write short essays of about 500 words each per sticker, as well as even shorter versions of about 150 words each that would be used as description fields or metadata for the Street Art Graphics digital archive. For some reason, the students often wrote two separate, unrelated pieces. Typically, they did a fine job contextualizing the historical and cultural content of the stickers, but not such a good job describing what was being depicted in each sticker and what those depictions signified. In that regard, some of the basic information for each sticker was missing. Cataloguing can be a challenge; one needs to identify the visual and textual elements, describe their significance, and outline the larger issues that are pointed to in each sticker.

As a side note, I recently discovered the Centro de Recuperación de Pegatinas, an Aragon-based center that has catalogued and archived over 40,000 Spanish stickers. They did posts on Adolfo Suárez, the miners’ march of 2012, and an exhibition of stickers related to Picasso’s Guernica painting, all of which feature stickers in my collection.






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