Archive for November, 2013

FC St. Pauli stickers #2

I did a little more research and polished my previous blog post on St. Pauli stickers for two reasons: 1.) I needed a shorter, condensed version without links to use in the Street Art Graphics digital archive, and 2.) I will use this version in the traveling exhibition, Re-Writing the Streets: The International Language of Stickers.  I can also use this exercise to show students the differences and similarities among a blog post, metadata for a digital archive, and an exhibition text panel.

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Hamburg, the German port city home to the St. Pauli football club (Fußball St. Pauli or FC St. Pauli), hosts a sports team well known for its outspoken anti-racist, anti-fascist, anti-sexist, and anti-homophobic politics and its staunchly progressive social activism.  Founded in 1910, the club is located in the working-class district along the docks near the Reeperbahn red-light district, and for the past thirty years has maintained a certain cult following across Europe, initially attracting radicals, squatters, dockers, and prostitutes in the 1980s, and later, anarchists, punks, bikers, anti-fascists, and other politicized groups.  Known as the “pirates of the league,” the club has adopted a number of shipyard-related visual icons, including the Jolly Roger flag’s skull and crossbones, which is the unofficial crest and seen everywhere, as well as anchors, galleons, and sword brandishing buccaneers.  St. Pauli was the first team in Germany to ban right-wing activities and displays at its stadium, in response to hooligan fascists and neo-Nazis in the 1980s and ‘90s that were infiltrating matches across the country, fighting rival teams and police, and causing a great deal of violence and damage.  The sticker “St. Pauli-fans gegen Rechts!” or “St. Pauli fans against the Right!” has been widely produced and distributed and is said to have sold over two million copies.  Variants of “St. Pauli is brown [and] white,” the team’s home and away colors, are also common.  Many St. Pauli stickers portray the revolutionary guerrilla leader, Ernesto “Che” Guevara.  Others incorporate ad-busting techniques and similar forms of culture jamming, as seen in the appropriation of popular television and cartoon characters such as Homer Simpson, Hello Kitty, and Beavis and Butthead.

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One of St. Pauli’s closest rival teams, the wealthier Hamburger Sport-Verein (HSV or H$V), utilizes a blue, white, and black diamond crest that is often mocked in St. Pauli stickers.

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St. Pauli football club stickers

Hamburg, the German port city that is home to the St. Pauli Football Club, hosts a sports team well known for its outspoken anti-racist, anti-fascist, anti-sexist, and anti-homophobic politics and its staunchly progressive activism.  Founded in 1910, the Club is located in the working-class district along the docks near the Reeperbahn red-light district.  For the past 30 years, the team has maintained a certain cult following across Europe, initially attracting radicals, squatters, dockers, and prostitutes in the 1980s, and later, anarchists, punks, bikers, anti-fascists, and other politicized groups.  You can read more at When Punk and Football Collide, Punks, prostitutes and St. Pauli: Inside soccer’s coolest club, and Hamburg, Germany: Football fans say ‘Love St Pauli, Hate Racism’.

Known as the “pirates of the league,” the St. Pauli Club has adopted a number of shipyard-related visual icons, including the Jolly Roger flag’s skull and crossbones, which is the team’s logo and seen everywhere, as well as anchors, galleons, and sword brandishing buccaneers.

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St. Pauli was the first team in Germany to ban right-wing activities and displays at their stadium, in response to hooligan fascists and neo-Nazis in the 1980s and ‘90s that were infiltrating matches across the country, fighting rival teams and police, and causing a great deal of violence and damage.  The sticker “St. Pauli-fans gegen Rechts!” or “St. Pauli fans against right extremism!” has been widely produced and distributed and by now is said to have sold over two million copies.  There is even a Facebook page for Sankt Pauli Fans gegen Rechts.

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Ultras named on stickers refer to extreme football fan clubs and can lean both left and right.  Several St. Pauli fan clubs have been formed in the last 20 years, including the Sankt Pauli Skinheads in 1996 and the St. Pauli Ultras in 2002.  In these cases, skinheads, punks, and other alternative sub-groups are self-defined anti-fascists.  You can get a good sense of the raucous nature of a St. Pauli game at The accidental ultra – St Pauli away (“away” meaning “visitor” to the Brit author).

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The revolutionary guerrilla leader Che Guevera is represented on many St. Pauli stickers, as are other iconic figures, including the American actor John Goodman with a handgun from the movie The Big Lebowski and Yoda the Jedi Master from Star Wars.

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Other football related stickers in this series include A.C.A.B. (or 1312), which stands for “all cops are bastards.”

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Arline Wolfe at SLU recently catalogued over 100 St. Pauli stickers and added them to the Street Art Graphics digital archive (click on “sports”), or you can view the uncatalogued stickers on my Flickr site here.

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Solicitud de pegatinas españolas / Request for Spanish stickers

Me llamo Catherine Tedford, y soy la directora de la Galería de Arte en St. Lawrence University (SLU), localizada en el norte del estado de New York en los Estados Unidos.  En estos momentos Marina Llorente, profesora de lengua y literatura española en SLU y yo misma estamos trabajando en un proyecto sobre pegatinas como arte de la calle o callejero y otros materiales impresos como carteles, etc.  En una de las clases de Marina titulada “Literatura, cine y cultura de masas en la España contemporánea,” los estudiantes tienen que hacer un trabajo de investigación en el cual estudian las pegatinas, carteles y el arte que se puede encontrar en la calle en relación a los movimientos y los acontecimientos políticos actuales así como la cultura popular española.  Durante la primavera del año 2013, presentamos una exposición del trabajo que hicieron los estudiantes que se puede encontrar en el siguiente enlace: http://stlawu.edu/gallery/exhibitions/f/13streetart_sp.php.

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A Marina y a mí nos gustaría ofrecer la posibilidad de hacer este tipo de investigación a los estudiantes de nuevo y, quizás, ustedes puedan ayudarnos enviándonos pegatinas, carteles, etc. que su organización produzca y que nuestros estudiantes podrían investigar.  Mi dirección postal se encuentra debajo.  Los materiales que nos manden serán escaneados, catalogados y se añadirán al archivo digital internacional de Arte gráfico de la calle o callejero, que se puede encontrar en el siguiente enlace: http://www.stlawu.edu/gallery/digitalcollections/contemporarystreet.php.

La universidad de St. Lawrence tiene un próspero programa de estudios para nuestros universitarios en España en el cual pueden estudiar durante un semestre o un año académico en Madrid.  Para más información véase http://www.stlawu.edu/ciis/program/spain/introduction.

Les agradecemos de antemano la atención que puedan prestarnos en el desarrollo de este proyecto.

Saludos cordiales,

Catherine Tedford

Dirección postal: Richard F. Brush Art Gallery, St. Lawrence University, 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY 13617 (United States)

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Dear friend,

My name is Catherine Tedford, and I am the art gallery director at St. Lawrence University (SLU), located in northern New York in the United States.  I am working with Marina Llorente, professor of Spanish language and literature at SLU, on a project involving street art stickers and other printed materials (flyers, etc.).  In one of Marina’s classes, “Literatura, cine y cultura de masas en la España contemporánea,” we have a research and writing assignment in which students study Spanish street art stickers and flyers in relation to current political events and popular culture.  In the spring of 2013, we presented an exhibition of this work, which you can read about at: http://stlawu.edu/gallery/exhibitions/f/13streetart_sp.php.

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Marina and I would like to offer this writing assignment to students again, and we are wondering if you would be able to send stickers and flyers from your organization for this purpose.  My address is below.  Your materials will also be scanned, catalogued, and added to an international digital archive of Street Art Graphics, which you can find at http://www.stlawu.edu/gallery/digitalcollections/contemporarystreet.php.

St. Lawrence has a very successful off-campus study program in Spain, in which students can study in Madrid for one or two semesters (http://www.stlawu.edu/ciis/program/spain/introduction).

Thank you for your time, and I hope you will be able to help us with this exciting project.

Best wishes,

Catherine Tedford

Materials can be sent to: Richard F. Brush Art Gallery, St. Lawrence University, 23 Romoda Drive, Canton, NY 13617 (United States)

Vote Republican 1926 sticker

I recently came across a U.S. political sticker from Iowa in 1926 that is one of the first of its kind, from what I’ve seen, that isn’t an I.W.W. Wobbly labor union stickerette (see previous posts on I.W.W. stickerettes).  What’s interesting, however, is how Ralph Chaplin, a 1910s-era I.W.W. key artist/agitator, talked about printed labels on various fruit and vegetable cartons that helped inspire him to create political stickers.  I’ll dig up those references for a later post.

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