Archive for November, 2014

More from Easy Tiger, #1 Asia Stickers Museum

Meiffi Oscar from Easy Tiger, #1 Asia Stickers Museum in Indonesia sent me a little more information about his background and interest in stickers and sticker culture (see also previous post on Indonesian political stickers from Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum). He writes:

“I [went on] a motorcycle tour from Java to Sumatra from December 2010 to February 2011. It was remarkable achievement for me cause I used my classic Japanese bike (Honda CB 100cc, 1976). Along the way I saw nature, culture, and got a lot of stickers. Instead of sticking them on my helmet, I just kept them for no reason. It was because I had no copy of them, and limited edition (in terms that I don’t wanna lose it cause it’s an artifact from my journey). Then I got a chance to visit Electric Ladyland Museum in Amsterdam and it made me kept thinking of what kind of museum that I should build.

Then voila, I remembered my motorcycle clubs stickers I had before my trip. I decided to turn the idea into a museum in August 2012 (collecting, hunting, online buying, exchange, asking for donations, etc.).

What I meant before with ignorable stuff (in my other note) is sticker is great art in a small size. People never notice it. If they have it, they stick it. They never think of the story behind it or if they won’t see it again in the future. In terms of preserving this culture, I start to built this art movement.

In Indonesia, lots of people just laugh at classic or vintage stickers from 80’s now. Those stickers are so rare. So it’s my duty to track them, give back the good old memories. In fact, it’s still relevant with nowadays issues such ‘quote’ stickers like ‘silence is gold,’ ‘time is money,’ etc. To prevent this stuff from being abandoned in the future, I also preserve the stickers from present day. I’m thinking about the legacy for the next generation.

Whether it’s for art or research or exhibition or… just for laughs. I bet 100%, once we see stickers from our youth era, we will at least smile. That’s the point. To keep the spirit alive. Even it’s small, cheap, full of tacky or cheesy words, or vulgar, or whatever, I’ll collect all of them. They are the treasure, the legend itself.”

Thanks, Meiffi!  Here is another sticker from the batch I received from him yesterday.  I’m going to need a little help making sense of it.

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Indonesian political stickers from Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum

Oli at Hatch Kingdom told me that someone named Meiffi Oscar has opened a new sticker museum in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, called Easy Tiger, Asia #1 Stickers Museum.

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I got in touch with Meiffi through Facebook, and we have traded some stickers and zines. When asked about Easy Tiger, Meiffi wrote:

“Well, actually the place is my dorm so it’s pretty small for a ‘museum.’ But I dare to claim it though. I got involved in this project when I had inspiration from visiting a unique museum in Amsterdam called Electric Ladyland Museum. After that I’m so eager to play a role as a museum director. And voila, I started the museum about a month later. In fact, the stickers passion is genetic in my blood since I was 15. I’m an old bike rider so we collect lots of motorcycle clubs stickers. And that push me to start to think about how to preserve this art so I can share it with others (like vintage stickers, limited stickers, etc.). I love museums and like being a museum guide, but I never thought about being the director. The way I saw the director of the museum in Amsterdam influenced me to build a small project but something fun and worthy to inspire people. I combine it with vintage stuff, music, and books, so it’ll entertain my friends who just want to chill out. We have a radio though. Haha. So yes, it’s worth having this project.”

For more information about Easy Tiger, go to Meiffi’s blog Stickers Culture, some of which is in Indonesian and some in English.

Yesterday, I received four new political stickers that Meiffi sent from Indonesia. I am going to share what he wrote in his letter to me to help explain the stickers.

“Here is my small package. It’s about the new President, Joko Widodo (Jokowi), who won the election on July 20th [2014] and will lead us now till 2019.

There is a lot of unique facts about this person. He was an ex-governor of Indonesia’s capital, Jakarta. And the way he leads is unusual and eccentric. He loves to be in the front line when he visits his people. No wonder during the flood in Jakarta, he even took a boat and met refugees directly and straight. No such formal protocol. Once, he checked a sewer by himself. Yes, by himself. It’s not propaganda. But this is his habit for many, many years. Before, he was mayor of Solo (Surakarta). I’ve got a unique story about this. In Surakarta, there’s a public space [that] was occupied by the street sellers for many years. It was a problem for city planners. So this guy used a different approach. He used a smooth approach. By inviting them to have a dinner at his house and they discussed the problem together. But it’s not the end. He did this many times to persuade them to follow the government program about relocation. And guess what, those street sellers want to be relocated after all. And how many times did Jokowi invite them to his house? More than 40 times! I’m not joking, more than 40!

So what I’m trying to say is there’s a new hope in this guy. He tries to make a revolution about Indonesian mentality. About corruption, discipline, hard working, unique, and eccentric (he loves metal music). Perhaps you’re not surprised cause maybe you know lots of leaders like that, but for Indonesians, this is new! And this is a breakthrough.

These stickers [present] a unique concept about how Jokowi and his vice president are doing a blusukan (Javanese term for exploring deeply looking for something).

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So no wonder the volunteer for the election made these stickers. Jokowi in here, Jokowi in there. With his white long sleeves and informal appearance.

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And the design is so unique, using the style of the Hergé [cartoonist], Tintin! A [Belgian] journalist who traveled all around the world with lots of adventures. That’s Jokowi! A nation hero!

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I think that’s enough for this letter. My apologies if my English isn’t so good or you may find incorrect grammar in it. I try my best. Once again, thank you for considering Indonesian political stickers. I’m glad to share it with you. Keep roaring! Roarrrrrr!”

Thank you, Meiffi, for these great stickers from Asia.  I’ll add them to the Street Art Graphics digital archive!

Pegatinas Writing Assignment Part One: Annotating Images for Digital Archive

For the upcoming assignment at St. Lawrence University to have Marina Llorente’s students analyze political stickers from Spain, I decided to split the project into two parts. Part One will ask students to annotate the images, and Part Two will ask students to use the annotations to write about what the stickers mean (i.e., what are the larger issues that the stickers point to?). I’m doing it this way now because the last time we offered the assignment, students did well contextualizing the stickers but sometimes forgot to describe all of the textual and visual elements of the stickers. Those descriptions are important in a digital archive because people access images through word searches. If descriptive words are missing, access is curtailed. Descriptions fields are so thorny! If you think about it, one needs to list everything in the sticker, but one also needs to provide historical and cultural background and draw attention to issues beyond the sticker itself. Below is what I prepared for Part One of the writing assignment using this sticker from the Izquierda Anticapitalista (Anti-capitalist Left).

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ASSIGNMENT

For this assignment, you will be analyzing political street art stickers from Spain for a Street Art Graphics digital archive that is publicly available on the gallery’s Web site:

1. The first step is to annotate the images. This will help you with your analysis.

2. Open the image file in Preview and click on Tools/Annotate/Text.[1]

3. Choose a contrasting color and type large numbers onto all of the visual and textual elements in the image including each line of text, the images, logos, Web sites, and anything else. Number these elements in a way that makes logical sense. The most important elements should be listed first. Every element in the sticker is there for a reason, so it’s your job to figure them all out. After you number the elements, save and close the file. If you need to re-number anything, you’ll need to re-start with the raw image file again (once the numbered file is saved and closed, it locks the annotations in place). You’ll see below how #1A, #1B, #1C, and #1D all indicate text; #2 indicates a face; #3 indicates a logo; #4 indicates a Web site; and #5 indicates a QR code.

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INSTRUCTIONS

#1 text: Type all of the text that appears in the sticker in a way that makes logical sense. For cataloguing purposes, the first letter of each word is capitalized, and the remaining letters in each word should be small (not capitalized). Use a dash between different sections of the text so that it reads in a normal, common sense way. If the text appears in Spanish, translate it into English in the same fashion. Any and all Spanish text in the sticker should be in written in italics.

#2 image/color: Identify who or what is being represented in the image (people, objects, buildings, graphic design elements, color, composition, i.e., everything!) and include any other information that seems relevant or important. Be as specific as possible. For example, in my description below, see how I put “photo portrait” of Angela Merkel instead of “picture,” “drawing,” “illustration,” etc. “Portrait” here also implies head vs. her entire body in action. I also noted who Merkel is and how the type font affects our interpretation of the text. In terms of color, most stickers are either black on white or black and other colors on white.

#3 logo: Describe the logo’s shape, color, etc. and what the logo suggests. Does it play off any other existing logo (i.e., is it a form of “culture jamming”)? HINT: Take a close-up screen shot of the logo and drag the image file into Google Images and see what you find. It’s a handy way to see if and how the logo relates to anything else. Sometimes, it’s the only way to find out!

#4 Web site: Describe the purpose or function of the organization that created the sticker.

#5 QR code: Find the Web site where the QR code sends you. Is it something else besides the organization’s main Web site? What is the purpose of the Web site?

ACTUAL EXAMPLE OF ANNOTATED STICKER

#1 text: Des Obedece – ¡Su Deuda No La Pagamos! – Vota Anticapitalistas – Anticapitalistas.org; Disobey – ¡We Are Not Paying Their Debt! – Vote Anticapitalists! – Anticapitalistas.org

#2 image/color: Photo portrait of German politician Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany (2005-present). Her face is covered by a large circle that hides most of her eyes, nose, and mouth. The use of a bold graphic type font suggests an urgent appeal for a response. Black and army green on white.

# 3 logo: Faceted star-shaped logo for Izquierda Anticapitalista or Anticapitalist Left.

#4 Web site: www.anticapitalistas.org for Izquierda Anticapitalista or Anti-capitalist Left, a Spanish revolutionary, ecologist, feminist, and internationalist organization that fights against all kinds of exploitation, oppression, and domination over people and the environment. The full-color logo in red, purple, and green signifies the different ideas that the organization supports: socialists or communists (red), feminists (purple), and green movements (green).

#5 QR code: A QR code on the sticker points to the Web site http://www.anticapitalistas.org/elecciones2011/index.html, which encourages people to vote for an alternative anti-capitalist government during the Spanish general election on November 20, 2011. The Web site states, “El 20N desobedece” or “The 20N disobeys.

Part Two: Writing a 150- to 200-word analysis of the sticker, placing it in a social and historical context. More information to follow!

[1] Photoshop is also fine for annotating images.

Stuck-Up Pin-Up

The vintage press photos that I’ve been collecting lately regarding sticker culture in the United States seem to feature politicians in big dark suits standing next to campaign stickers or women posing with stickers (see also Republican Stickerkitty).

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This United Press photo from 1957 has a caption taped on the back that states, “Stuck-Up Pin-Up. Playing tag with very pleasant results, shapely Elsa Howorka of Rego Park, Long Island, N.Y., decorates her swimsuit with a package of airline baggage stickers at Wantagh, L.I. The result is enough to gladden the heart of any freight handler, although there’s certainly no resemblance between Miss Howorka and a bag.”

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One exception is a press photo of Joe and Marjorie Picket.


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